What are best practices for opt-in forms?

Jan. 28, 2019, 1:55 p.m.

1 Answer


Feb. 18, 2019, 10:39 a.m.

It is known that good opt-in form on your landing page or website is the easiest way to get more email subscribers. But creating a form that really works well and improves your email ROI is not so easy. Here are some of the best practices for opt-in forms.


Make it visible
It must be located in a place that gets a lot of eye traffic. Avoid putting it at the footer of your website. Bottom of your blog posts and sidebar are one of the best places. Try to avoid intrusive pop-up forms that annoy people and can be simply blocked by ad-blocking tools.


Give the reason and value
There’s a lot of valuable content you can provide for an opt-in such as e-books, white papers, access codes, gifts, extra content, or free reports. You must simply tell your visitors that they will get some extra additional content in exchange for their address.


Don’t ask for too much information
Do you really need users' last name, telephone or birth date? Try to get only the most common and relevant information: first name and an email address. The name allows you to put it into subject lines of your messages so better don’t give it up.


Try a double opt-in form
Double opt-in forms protect your emails from getting marked as spam. This method requires users to complete the form and respond to your confirmation email. It reduces the number of recipients but increases your prospects quality at the same time.


Be careful with the CTA button
Instead of using the most common "Subscribe" version (which is boring, to be honest), try something different. Use the value of your extra content and put on your button something like "I want an extra knowledge". If that seems weird, maybe "join us" would work?

Every opt-in form is different and it should be! Try different versions and places and analyze your results. The best option is the one that works for you.